Fade far away dissolve and quite forget

Fade far away, dissolve, and quite forget, The voice l hear this passing night was heard, And the stately ships go on, O well for the fisherman’s boy Full Explanation

Fade far away, dissolve, and quite forget

What thou among the leaves that never known

The weariness the fever and the fret

Here, where men sit hear each other groans,

Where palsy, shakes a few, sad last grey hairs.

Where youth grows pale, and specter thin and dies,

Where has to think is to be full of sorrow.

Expl. These lines have been taken from Keats’s “Ode to a Nightingale” written by John Keats. Here the poets refer to this world of sorrow. Here young people lose their glow of health and strength. Many people become deadened in their limbs.

Many grow old, weak, and cripled. Indeed people grow sick of their lives because of their painful struggle. They hardly get any respite. Their dreams are shattered. Their hopes are dashed to the ground. Life to them is an unending misery.

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The poet, therefore, wishes to run away from this world of sorrows. He wants to die and forget altogether the miseries of human existence which the nightingale never experiences. It lives in the midst of Nature. There are no sorrows, no pains, no suffering, no despair.

The voice l hear this passing night was heard

The voice l hear this passing night was heard

In ancient days by emperor and clown;

Perhaps the self-same sang that found a path

Through the sad heart of Ruth, when sick for home.

She stood in tears amid the alien com.

Expl. These lines have been taken from the poem, “Ode to a Nightingale” written by John Keats. The poet hears the song of the nightingale. It is the same song that was heard in ancient times. This makes the poet call the nightingale immortal.

The bird’s song opens out the flood gate of the poet’s memory. It takes him into the far of the age of romance. It is the same song that the nightingale has been pouring out since the beginning of the world.

It is the same song which, in the past, must have been heard by kings and peasants alike. It is the same song that Ruth heard when she stood sad and lonely in the cornfield of a strange land. Ruth was the unfortunate wife of Jadah.

She had to live far away from her home. After the death of her husband, she lived with her mother-in-law. She earned he living by collecting coins in the field. She derived consolation from the song of the nightingale. So, does Keats, What a flight of fancy!

And the stately ships go on

And the stately ships go on

To their haven under the hill;

But O for the touch of a vanished hand.

And the sound of a voice that is still!

Expl. These lines have been taken from the poem. “Break, Break, Break” Written by Lord Tennyson a great poet of the victorian age. His poetry expressed both the merits and defects of his time, and it is characterized by an exquisite scene of the beauty and delicacy of workmanship.

Here the poet feelingly refers to his dead friend, Arthur Hallam, His health is a staggering blow to him. His friend, Arthur off is the prime of life. He now lies cold in his grave near the watching, place in Clevedon.

The poet expresses his feeling of sorrow in-a language which is suggestive with meaning. He standing by the seashore and is looking at the boats and ships gently sailing towards the hilly shore.

He feels that it will stop and people will gate down and renew contact. But alas! Hallam is no more. His voice can never be heard. He will no more touch his shoulders with delicate hands. Thus the sight of ships takes up the memory of a friend Who is dead and gone.

It is suggested that movement signifies life whereas stillness is a symbol of death

O well for the fisherman’s boy

O well for the fisherman’s boy

That he shouts with his sister at play!

O well for the sailor lad,

That he sings in his boat on the day!

Expl. These lines have been taken from the poem, “Break, Break, Break” Written by Lord Tennyson, a great poet of the victorian age. Here the poet, who mourns the death of his dear friend, Hallam, contrasts the happiness of the world around him with his own sorrow. In this way, he reveals the tragic loss that he has sustained.

Standing on the seashore at Clevedon the poet sees a fisherman’s boy and his sister playing on the beach. They have no care to furrow their brow. They, therefore, merrily pass away their time. They shout to each other in a carefree, gay abandon manner.

The poet also hears sailor-lad singing joyfully on his boat in the bay. Neither the fisherman’s boy nor the sailor-lad knows what ails the poet. Moreover, they have not tasted sorrow. Hence their life is a memory note.

The poet by contrasting his deep-seated sorrow with the joyful activities of the fisherman’s boy and the sailor lad heightens his own sense of loss. He exercises restraint over his feelings and produces a tragic grandeur.

Break Break Break

Break, Break, Break,

At the foot nf thy crags, O Sea!

But the tender grace of a day that is dead

Will never come back to me.

Expl. These lines have been taken from the poem entitled “Break, Break. Break” Written by Tennyson. Here the poet expresses his sorrow at the death of someone loved and lost. Standing on the seashore at Clevedon he mourns the death of his friend, Arthur Hallam.

Analysis of tears idle tears by Alfred Lord Tennyson (click)

He watches the dashing waves, the merry children, and the stately ships handing towards the harbor. He feels that they can have no inkling into his mind which is preoccupied with the thought of his dead friend.

Indeed the sea will continue to dash against the craggy shore. The mirth and merriment of this world will continue as usual. Only the poet’s loss is irreparable. He can no longer bring back those happy days he spent in the company of his friend.

These are the outpourings of a man who has sustained a personal loss in the death of his friend. In a controlled manner, the poet describes the feelings that well up in his dead friend, Arthur Hallam. Thus the title of the poem is apt and correct.

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