One shade the more one rays the less

One shade the more one rays the less What is my leaves are falling like its own Oh lift me as a wave a leaf a cloud  Be through my lips to unawakened earth All Explanation  of New Golden Treasury

One shade the more, one rays the less,

Had half impaired the nameless grace

Which waves in every raven tree.

Or,

Softly lightens aver her face.

Where thoughts serenely sweet express

How pure how to wear their dwelling place.

Expl. One shade the more one rays the less These lines have been taken from “She walks in Beauty” by Lord Byron. Byron was a romantic poet of the 19th century. He had a breadth of vision and love of Nature.

He was a man of violent emotion and extravagant assertion. In the present lines, he describes the unique beauty, of his caution. Mrs Wilmot appeared to him unprecedented meeting pain of darkness and glamour.

His appearance was marvellous. Any addition and reduction would have spoiled her grace. The beauty of her hair or to the totality of the appearance of the face was a unique marvel of beauty. Her face appeared to be a dwelling place of screen thought and pure feelings.

What is my leaves are falling like its own

Make me they lyer, ev’n as the forest is:

What is my leaves are falling like its own!

She tumult of the mighty harmonies.

Will take from both a deep autumnal tone.

Sweet though in sadness.

Expl, These lines have been taken from the poem, “Ode to the West Wind” composed by Shelley, a great romantic poet of the early 19th century. He is considered being one of England’s finest lyric poets. He was revolutionary and idealist.

Here Shelley asks the West Wind to draw out from the lyre of his mind the prophetic notes lying hidden within it, just as it draws out the mind has lost its youthful ardour and buoyancy.

But what does matter? The forest, too, has lost its summer glory and is now leafless. The West Wind may not be able to elicit the joyous tune of summer or spring from either but the deep music of Autumn is present in health.

Shelley asks the wind to carry his message of hope to the yet slumbering humanity. The sheer sees the vision of Millenium and makes the wind the mouthpiece of the massage.

Oh lift me as a wave a leaf a cloud

Oh, lift me as a wave, a leaf a cloud!

A fall upon the thorns of life! bleed!

A heavy weight of hours has chained and bowed

One too like thee: tameless, and swift and proud.

Expl. These lines have been taken from the poem entitled “Ode to the West Wind” composed by Shelley, the most revolutionary in outlook of the Romantics.

Here the poet invokes the spirits of West Wind and seeks its help. A heavy weight of hours has chained and bowed his tameless swift and proud spirit.

He has contended with hostile forces. His dreams of a better social order have been shattered he has been frustrated and disillusioned. He has fallen upon the thrones of fife and he bleeds.

The poet wants to be lifted like a wave, a leaf, a cloud. His indomitable spirit has been crushed, his freedom been crushed.

He, therefore, request the West Wind to give him power and speed, courage and hope to feel his own worth and splendid things in the world.

Bethouspirit Tierce

Bethouspirit Tierce,

My spirit! be thou me, impetuous one

Drive my dead thoughts over the universe

Like withered leaves to quicken a new birth

And by the Incantation of this verse.

Scatter, as from an unextinguished hearth

Ashes and sparks, my words among mankind!

Be though My lips to unknown end earth

The trumpet of a prophecy!

Expl. These lines have been taken from the poem, “Ode to the West Wind” written by Shelley. He was a reformer as well as a poet. He wanted to renovate the world to bring about Utopia.

The West Wind moves everywhere. It at once attracts the attention of the poet. He invoked its spirit. He wants a complete merger with this terrible hostile world.

People do not lend him their ears. His revolutionary ideas do not find favour with them. His own personal tragedies add to his agony. He says that he has fallen on the thrones of life.

His dreams of a better social order are hard to realize. His restless, proud spirit has been chained. He, therefore, requests the West Wind to blow through his heart and carry his message to the sleeping mankind to bring about Utopia.

The poet speaks helps to the West Wind by burying and fertilizing the seeds its help, the outburst of new life spring.

Be through my lips to unawakened earth

Be through my lips to unawakened earth

The trumpet of a prophecy! O Wind

If winter comes, can spring be far behind?

Expl. These lines have been taken from the poem. “Ode to the West Wind” was written by Shelley. The flow and ease, the passionate tone of his lyrics are hardly surpassed by any of his contemporaries.

Shelley is a man of missionary zeal. The greatest ambition of his life is to change this sorry scheme of entire. He feels that the old world with its false convention and prejudices must go and a new world of hope and fulfilment come.

He believes that there is so much cause for lament. However, a day will come when these difficulties, these suffering will be conquered and the happy state of which he dreamt so nobly will be a reality.

This thought makes him happy and believes that the end will be however distant a happy one. The bareness of twenty seasons will pass away.

The spring hope and promise will come soon. Beyond the decay and barrenness of a wintry age, there glimmers the spring of a millennium.

These lines breadth, robust optimism. In fact, Shelley is a prophet of humanity. He sees the prophetic vision of a new world free from all shackles.

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